July 29, 2015

Paper to Product: Edition 217

This week's paper to product features two shirts that you don’t see too often: the Popover and the Club Collar. Both styles are true classics and have held their ground throughout decades of trends.

While the two shirts have very different origins, this week they share a common thread. You see, they are not cut from just any ole fabric, but one that we’re a little more obsessed with than usual.

A year or two ago we came across a few yards of some old, deadstock shirting. It looked like simple and traditional men’s shirting from the 60s but it was soft and had faded a bit over time. We handed our discovery over to a customer and vintage-aficionado to make into some custom shirts, working with him to construct some wilder styles, two of them being a club collar and a popover. The results were unlike anything we had made before. The juxtaposition of antiqued fabrics with modern styling and fit-details worked on all levels. Of course we wanted to make more, but the ten yards was long gone. We decided to send the swatches to our partner mill in Portugal and worked with them to replicate the fabric. They absolutely nailed it. The slightly vintage patina, the faded color palette, the buttery-soft hand-feel—it was all there.

The Club Collar has the same fit as our California and Jack shirts, and it features our signature rounded pocket.

The Popover is a touch bigger in the stomach and around the hips so you can pop it on-and-off easily, and it is 1” shorter in length because it is always worn untucked. Our Popover also features some killer construction details: double-needle sewing in the front placket, a flat bottom with twill-tape-finished side vents, and a slit-sleeve placket finished with the same twill tape. Our favorite little detail is on the pocket: a cross-grain overlay that adds the subtlest hint of intrigue.

Both styles are relatively limited for the time being and there is a good chance that there won't be many left after the Workshop period. That’s not to say you won’t be seeing a lot more of this vintage goodness in the future, it just might be next spring before you do.